Today we’ll feature photos of flowers blooming in the gardens of readers who love flowers but don’t have their own blog. We’re calling it the August 2013 Garden Nonbloggers’ Bloom Day. (The Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day is hosted around the 15thish of each month by Carol at May Dreams Gardens.)

First up, from Turnbull farms in beautiful Bloomington, Indiana, this head-turner sunflower:

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And this one:

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Sunchokes:

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Cucumber blossom:

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Okra blossom:

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Wildflower:

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Also from Turnbull Farms, this eggplant blossom:

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Prickly poppy flower:

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And this stunner, which he called a klip dagga flower (I’ve never seen one – they are so cool!):

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Thank you for sharing! What a great looking farm!

From Nancy Popp Mumpton in Phoenix, “Just one picture of a blooming Uncarina for non-bloggers bloom day, but I love the cheery yellow color.”

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Me, too, Nancy! They’re adorable!

We also have contributions from Ginny Burton of DC. Says Ginny, <<<<Good old cannas! I got these in trade from GardenWeb a couple of years ago.  They’ve multiplied so much, I’ll be offering these in trades this fall. Let me know if you’d like some!

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I saw a gorgeous stand of yellow cannas and yellow daylilies growing in a neighbor’s yard.  I didn’t know who she was, so I wrote a note to the “Expert Gardener” at that address, asking if I could trade some irises for some of the cannas.  She came over a few days later with a huge bag of them.  Unfortunately, I didn’t store them very well over the winter because only a few came up.  I’m hoping for them to spread!

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This is another GW trade: Yellow King Humbert.  I think next year I’ll put them with the yellow cannas.

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I’m very proud of this: Franklinia alatamaha.  I grew it from seed.  I used to grow them easily, then one day read how difficult they are to propagate from seed and ever since I’ve been unable to grow a single one!  They have all sorts of genetic problems because every existing Franklinia is descended from the ones that John Bartram gathered in the 1770s.

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Its flowers are like small magnolia blossoms and have a soft lemony scent.

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That’s it for me!  Thanks for hosting us non-bloggers!>>>>

Nicely done, Ginny – you should be proud. Such pretty flowers!

Thanks to all of you who submitted photos of what’s blooming in your gardens. I appreciate it!

I’ll be back tomorrow, hope to see you here!

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