And now it’s time to share photos of those gardeners who love flowers but who do not have their own blogs – the October 2013 Garden Nonbloggers’ Bloom Day.

Let’s start with Nancy Popp Mumpton in Phoenix, Arizona. Says Nancy:

>>>>”Attached are some photos of plants blooming today: Bougainvillea (of course it blooms for 9 months here), Hybrid ‘Sparky’ Tecoma Stans, Hybrid Lantana, Tecoma Stans (Yellow Bells), Datura. ‘Sparky’ was developed at Arizona State University with the Sun Devils colors of gold and maroon. The Datura flower is unusual for me in that it opened at night but lived all day the next day instead of only until noon. They have lavender edges also, probably from the cold nights.“>>>>

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Swoon, Nancy! I don’t think I’ve ever seen lavender-tipped Datura (Jimsonweed) before – it’s gorgeous. And I love Lantana, too. I enjoyed your story of how the trumpet flowers were created to match the University’s colors – that’s very cool.

Lovely flowers! Thank you so much for sharing them with us.

Let’s now take a look at Ginny Burton’s flowers, she lives in the DC area. Says Ginny:

>>>>“We had heavy rains for several days, so things are a bit bedraggled, but those zinnias just keep on keeping on, bless ’em!”

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This is my Alister Stella Gray rose which has climbed up 30′ Styrax japonicus and then flopped over to hang at nose height.  A fabulous rose, very fragrant.  In the background is my Franklinia, already changing color.  I grew both the Styrax and the Franklinia from seed and planted them too close together years ago when I didn’t know any better.

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My 7 year old Osmanthus (almost reaching the ceiling) just knocked us out lately in perfuming the breezeway. We’d come home from work, open the door, and be overwhelmed by its scent. It smelled just like the white peaches that we bought this summer at the Westover Farmers Market. 

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The bricks you see outside of the breezeway were collected (with permission of the builder!) from an old walkway and patio behind one of the 1950s houses that’s going to be torn down.  I asked if they planned to recycle/reuse the bricks and if not, would it be okay if I dug them up and carted them off.  Whoever made the patio did a superb job: bordered with timbers and set in a deep bed of sand, it was intact 60 years later.  The bricks are heavier than modern ones — over 5 pounds each. I got 500 of them!  When/if my energy returns, I plan to build some raised beds with them. 

Thanks for hosting this!

Ginny“>>>>

Lovely, lovely, lovely. Zinnias are the best, aren’t they? So reliable, so cheerful. I’d really like to grow an Osmanthus of my own, but I haven’t seen any available in the Albuquerque area. But I’m going to keep looking for one. You always talk about the scent of the blossoms, so now I’m totally curious.

Great score on the bricks! I hope you take lots of before and after pics of your raised beds and share them with us. I think it’s a fabulous idea to build your own. I’m looking forward to hearing more about them.

Thank you so much for sharing your flowers!

That’s it for today’s Garden Nonbloggers’ Bloom Day. Thanks for staying with us. I’ll be back tomorrow, I hope to see you here.

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